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فارسی

 

The Imamshahi sect of Nizari Ismailism (itself a branch of Shia Islam) which emerged in the fifteenth century due to split between Nizari Ismailis. Imam Shah was the son of Hasan Kabiruddin (died 1470), one of the main Pirs or local leaders of the Nizari mission the centre of which was located at Multan, Punjab, Pakistan. Imam Shah was a Nizari missionary who converted local people in Gujarat an Kuch to Ismailism. The converted Ismailis were superficially Muslims and kept many of their pagan beliefs. Imam Shah refused to recognize the leadership of Ismaili sect and broke away with followers. Imam Nuruddin Ali in 1525 instructed the faithful Ismailis to disassociate with followers of Sayed Nur Muhammad Shah. This breakaway group adopted the name Imam Shai. One other tradition has it that his son Sayyid Nur Muhammad Shah (died 1533) declared that Imam Shah was not merely a Pir but the real Imam of the time. His breakaway would have led to the emergence of the Imamshahis of Gujarat and Khandesh as a distinct group, separate from the Khojas and the term Satpanthi or “followers of the true path”, used in the ginans to describe all Ismailis came to be particularly reserved for the Imamshahis. Imamshahis diverted slowly back to local paganism and do not acknowledge any historical connection with the Nizari Ismailis. This majority of this small sect is slowly reverting back from Islam to paganism.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Page last updated: Friday, November 25, 2005 22:04:51 -0500