Qadianism

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فارسی

 

Qadianis (Ahmadis) are followers of Mirza Ghulam Ahmad (1839-1908), a Sunni Hanafi, born in the village of Qadian in India, who founded a heretic religious cult in the late nineteenth century in South Asia. Mirza Qadiani began to publish his Barahin-i Ahmadiyya in 1880. He declared himself a Nabi (prophet), Messiah, Mahdi and Mujaddid (a renewer of faith) in 1882 and set about spreading his message. In 1889, he claimed that he had received divine revelation from God authorizing him to accept the Baya, the allegiance of the faithful. Then in 1891 he declared himself the Mahdi, and the promised Messiah (Masih) of Islam. Mirza Qadiani ruled out armed struggle against the European colonial powers that have occupied the Muslim lands. Consequently, he received protection, support and encouragement from the British colonial government.

When he died Qadianism split into two sects, the Rabwa Qadianis and the Lahori Qadianis . The Rabwa Qadianis claimed that Mirza Qadiani was a prophet, and accused all Muslims who did not accept him, as being Kuffar (non-Muslims). The Lahori Qadiansi claim that he was a Mujaddid, Messiah and Mehdi not a prophet.

Qadianis consider themselves to be Muslim, but the Muslims hold the opposite view because of the Qadianis claim that their founder was a recipient of divine revelation and a prophet of God. This claim is believed by the Muslims and the government of Pakistan to violate a basic Islamic tenet regarding the finality of the Prophet Mohammad. The Pakistan's constitutional amendment of 1974 declared the Qadianism (Qadianis and Lahoris) as non-Muslims

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  Page last updated: Tuesday, February 14, 2006 12:48:19 -0500